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It’s amazing what a few billion snowflakes can do when they get organized – work with the wind – hold their ground.

We returned from vacation last night.  It was a twelve hour travel day, uneventful until we got home. While we were away, a blizzard moved through our hometown on Thursday Dec. 30th.   We weren’t worried, we had someone watching the house and PJ; all seemed to be in control.  So returning five days after the storm should be fairly uneventful, right?

We turned into our subdivision and found the street only partially cleared, a large drift down the middle of the street in front of our house and up into the yard at the corner.  Snow piles along the street showed us a payloader (front end loader) had been by, but had only partially cleared the intersection, where we promptly high-centered.  After getting free, I drove across our lawn to get to the driveway and into the garage.

We took our luggage inside and I fired up the snow thrower.

I looked up the ordinances this morning. According to city code I have five hours to clear my walks after a storm, or if the storm ends in the night, until 8:30 am.  Failure to comply can result in a $50 fine.

The city, however,  has no obligation to move the snow away from private property unless plowed windrows exceed 24″ in depth.  Ours is only 21″ deep so it looks like there’s no obligation on their part.  We’re not on the emergency snow route (which looks to me to take two hours or so to open up with one truck/driver). Even so, I was hoping the city would have done a little better in the five days since the storm’s end.

I submitted a request to have crews expedite snow removal at this intersection (was standing in it to take this shot of Brenda leaving for work this morning). Until then we’ll drive on the sidewalk a bit when we come and go.

Sidewalks – clear.

Fire hydrant – clear / accessible.

We’re in compliance, that’s what matters.

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