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You can call this a resolution – my first since nineteen eighty-something. For years I’ve found goal-setting more profitable than declaring resolutions, but this one qualifies:

In the coming year I’m going to pray differently than I have in the past.

As I draw everything I need from God, Christ being the Vine and the Holy Spirit the steady, constant supplier of my every provision, I have no need to worry. Ever. I’ve no cause to fret, only ask of Him. Mine is not to say how many, how much, or when. The fruit is God’s doing. Mine is to make sure I don’t quench or restrict His work, and He’s willing to help me even with that if I’ll just remember to ask Him. Knowing and living this way brings me freedom. Complete freedom.

2007 may prove to be an ambitious year. God knows that, even before it begins, and has packaged in allotments called “days” all I need for the year’s personal, family and ministry endeavors. It’s quite possible God has more in mind than I think might be reasonable to ask for! How much better to let Him decide those things! If 2007 is to be a quiet year, He knows that already and will provide quiet confidence for what He plans to do through me, my wife and children.

I do know He desires much fruit. He said so (John 15.5).

It brings Him great joy (15.8).

He gives me what I/we need and want as I/we remain (abide) in Him (15.6,17)

So I Will Ask. I Will Seek. I Will Knock. (Matthew 7.7),

Knowing I am Already Accepted in the Beloved (Ephesians 1.6).

But this year I will not Quantify or Define what Constitutes Answered Prayer.

God is God, not I, and He already knows.

I will Believe God.

I will Live Obediently.

I will Serve with Excellence

I will Pursue a Course of Life Capable of Producing Much Fruit

As the Spirit Flows Through Me.

But I will not tell God how much or when.

I will Simply Ask Him to make this a year of

MUCH FRUIT

–as He defines it–

Selah—

—PLR—

These thoughts stem from having recently re-read and studied the truths in  John 15 and thoughts and commentary by Andrew Murray, (1828-1917) in his Christian classic Abide in Christ.

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